Posts Tagged ‘Pro Supex Big Ace’

Not Sure which Tennis Racquet String is right for you?

April 3, 2014

Having a hard time picking the right tennis string for you? Not sure what to choose for your next restring? We here at The Tennis Depot offer sampler packs where you can try multiple sets of different strings at a 20% discount. We have over 11 different string sampler packs: http://www.thetennisdepot.com/other-products/string-packages.html

Our sampler packs include our best-sellers including Genesis Black Magic, Topspin Cyber Flash, Topspin Cyber Blue, Topspin Cyber Max ROTation,  Polyfibre Black Venom, Signum Pro Poly Plasma among many others. 

We also have Synthetic gut sampler packs for the player on a budget and seeking some great lower cost and softer alternatives to the co-polyester strings. Those include the Pro Supex Synthetic Gut Spiral Flex which is very similar to the popular Prince Synthetic Gut Duraflex and Prince Lightning, Genesis Blizzard Synthetic gut among others. 

Have questions? Need professional advise. We are always a phone call or click away!

 

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Keeping String Tension in Mind

May 11, 2010



This week, the topic up for discussion is string tension.  String tension is something that, despite being extremely important, most people don’t understand.  So here’s to making this a little more… lucid.

To me, string tension is every bit as important, if not MORE important, than any other part of your equipment (excluding the user, that is). String tension is also something that is extremely subjective, and depends on a variety of factors. What works for me may not work for you. What works for me on December 10th may completely fail me on July 10th.

First of all, what does string tension do? String tension influences how comfortable your string bed is. The higher the tension, the harsher the string bed, and the more damage your arm is liable to incur. For example, Kirschbaum Competition at 70 pounds will be harsher on your arm than will the same string at 50 pounds. If you’re having arm problems, consider dropping the tension on your string by 5 pounds and see how that works out for you. Also, string tension influences power. The higher the tension, the lower the power and the lower the tension, the higher the power (or rather, the ball will travel a longer distance with the same swing). If your shots are consistently shooting out by a couple of inches, consider upping the tension by 2-3 pounds.

Now, you might be wondering… why did Dan say that “What works for me on December 10th may completely fail me on July 10th ?” Well, strings tend to perform differently under different conditions (aka weather). The warmer the day, the “looser” the strings will feel, and shots will be a little deeper. As such, if you normally string Pro Supex Big Ace at 55 pounds in the winter, then you should consider upping the tension by 2 pounds in the warmer months to get a similar result. Also, humidity plays a factor on certain strings. Gut (such as newly available Pacific Tough Gut– try that out!) especially is particularly susceptible to humidity. If you’ve strung up with gut, either full or in a hybrid, then you probably shouldn’t use that particular racket in humid conditions. The reason is that humidity ruins gut: the strings will absorb the moisture in the air, and prolonged exposure to excessively humid conditions will make the gut strings virtually unplayable (they’ll lose tension, become a lot softer, and become “floppy”). That’s not to say that gut is the only string that humidity effects though. The more moisture there is in the air, the softer your string bed will feel. However, most strings will not be greatly effected by humidity.

A final point to keep in mind: string tension is EXTREMELY subjective.  What feels great to me might feel absolutely terrible to you.  Some people string their rackets in the teens, others, in the 70’s.  Find what works for YOU, not what works for person XXX.

The next time you’re getting your racket restrung, consider playing around a little with string tension. Up it a bit for more control, lower it a bit more for more power… who knows, maybe you’ll finally find your perfect setup?!

Hybrids

April 6, 2010

In the past few years, hybrids have become increasingly popular. More often than not, we see people with two different strings in their rackets. Many of pros have also gravitated towards hybrids: Federer with Alu and VS gut, Roddick with Hurricane and VS gut, etc. So, the questions that should come to mind are: what are the advantages of hybrids, and should I hybrid? I’ll try to answer both of those questions for you.

As a baseline, the hybrids that are generally used are gut mains with poly crosses, poly mains with gut crosses, gut mains with synthetic gut/multi crosses, and kevlar mains with synthetic gut crosses. There are several advantages to these various hybrids. First, hybrids combine the characteristics of two strings, and depending on how you string, can create some very nice combinations. The main strings are mainly responsible for the power (and with that, control) of the string bed, and also mainly for how the string bed feels. Thus, if you want your hybrid to feel mostly like polyester, then put your polyester string in the mains. If you want ultimate comfort, then put your gut in the mains. Crosses on the other hand add a bit of comfort and influence how stiff the string bed is. They will also influence power/control, but this influence is relatively small when compared to the influence of the mains. Thus, you can add a gut or a multi in the crosses to a polyester main to add some comfort and decrease the battering that your elbow gets. Or, you can add a polyester cross to a natural gut main to add a bit of control to the setup and increase stiffness. The second advantage of hybrids is cost. Let’s face it: strings can get pretty darn expensive. A full set of VS gut will set you back $42, a full set of Alu Rough will set you back around $16, and a full bed of Pro Line II will set you back around $12. I don’t know about you, but my wallet doesn’t appreciate being emptied every week. Thus, hybrids are nice. A hybrid of my favorite natural gut or polyester with a synthetic gut cross will cut my cost per string bed by around half, and give me something very close to that original feeling. Third, hybrids are generally easier to string that the full bed of string (despite giving a feel very close to a full bed). A bed of natural gut and synthetic is a lot easier to string than a full bed of natural gut. To go along with this, if your stringer is charging you extra for labor when he strings a hybrid, somebody’s trying to rip you off.

So to answer whether or not you should use a hybrid, you generally should if you fall into one of these categories: you want something that feels close to what you use now, but want something cheaper; you want something that’s a little more comfortable than the full bed of polyester you’re using now; you want to add a bit more control to what you’re using now (although this can be also done by adding a pound or two of tension to what you use now); or if you’re a stringer and want to have an easier time with stringing.

Hopefully, this will clear up any questions or confusion that you might have had about hybrids. If you’re still doubtful, take one for a try. I recommend taking whatever you use right now and using that for your mains and for your crosses, I’d recommend starting with a synthetic gut (favorites of mine include Forten Sweet and Pro Supex Syn Gut Spiral Flex). This should give you something close to what you normally use.

PS (if such a thing exists in a blog?) There are such things as prepackaged hybrids.  Take for example the Pro Supex Matrix Hybrid.  Such hybrids are nothing special- they’re just 2 half sets of strings that the manufacturer believes play well together.  You can get the exact same hybrid by purchasing one set each of Big Ace and Maxim Touch, cutting them in half and combining them.  Viola!  You’ve just created your very own “Pro Supex Matrix Hybrid.”

Black Magic or Spin X?

March 12, 2010

A few days… weeks… alright, months ago, an unknown string company entered the tennis string market. It was a small company that decided to introduce just two strings for its debut into the highly competitive tennis string market. Now, most companies like a nice balance of synthetic guts, multis and polyesters. Not this company. Judging from its first offerings, Genesis seems to be choosing the all-one-type-of-string route. They introduced two polyesters. EXCELLENT polyesters.

You’ve probably realized by now that I’m talking about Genesis. In the 9 months or so since Genesis strings hit the market, many players have fallen deeply in love. These polyesters bite hard, maintain their tension extraordinarily well, and are extremely comfortable. For most of us mere mortals, this is EXACTLY what we’re looking for in a third generation polyester.

But the problem is… which one? Do I choose Black Magic or Spin X? These strings fall right into the ever-growing category of sub-$100 reel polyesters, making them both very wallet friendly as well. Deciding on these strings based on price… well, it’s hard.

Let’s start with the Spin X. Spin X is textured. What that means is that Genesis manufactured these strings with a non-round shape, causing the string to BITE into the ball and created increased spin. As with all polyesters, Spin X generates an amazing amount of spin. It differs from most other textured polys (specifically MSV Hex, Blue Gear, among others) in that it maintains an excellent feel and allows you to feel connected to the ball. There’s a noticeable ball pocketing effect that just gives you this added smidge of confidence. There are two colors of this string, and it’s been reported that there’s a bit of difference. The pink/red string is slightly softer than its silver-colored brother. Both maintain tension well, and both have a nice feel, but the silver is for those looking to more closely replicate the feel of Luxilon Alu Rough (albeit it lacks the price tag and the pesky couple-of-hours-before-it-dies factor). It should be noted that with Spin X, there is a relatively steep tension drop in the first 24 hours after stringing, but then settles in and maintains that post-drop tension practically until it breaks.

Black Magic, on the other hand, is a smooth poly. It’s similar to Spin X, but it doesn’t give quite as much spin. I suppose you could say that Black Magic is similar to Big Ace, albeit stiffer and has less of a plasticky feel. Compared to Spin X, Black Magic has better feel. It’s a little more full-bodied, and is really quite enjoyable. Can you say that Black Magic is a better string? That would be pretty hard. They’re both excellent strings, and it would really be difficult to say which one is better.

Now, I’m not too sure whether or not I actually shifted your opinion one way or another. At the end of the day, they’re both excellent strings that come under $6 a set in reel form. Compare that to higher priced polys that come in at $15, $20 a set, and I’m left wondering how long Genesis is going to keep their prices this low. These are really excellent polyesters that can hang with the “Big Boys”. I recommend you hope on over to The Tennis Depot to try out a set of each and see which one YOU prefer.

Poly or not! with all the choices how to choose?

November 17, 2009

Cyberflash!, Tornado!,  Big Ace!, Black Magic!

Signum Pro Poly Plasma 16 (1.28)

These are just a few of the many high end polyester strings players have to choose from when they decide to step their string up to the next level.

In the past few years, and the emergence of polyester strings, the choices of what to put in your racquet have moved past nylon, synthetic, or natural gut. With a majority of professional players using some combination of co-polyesters and natural or synthetic guts juniors and club players want to use the same strings as the players they look up to.

The first thing to look at is why use polyester strings? Power, durability, increased control? The second area to look at, and is a concern when testing polyester strings, is elbow and shoulder issues. Polyester strings tend to be stiffer and harsher on the elbow and shoulder. However, there are many companies that have great options for the player that wants the feel of poly without the elbow issues.    

There are three strings I want to recommend. The first is a power string, for the high performance players, the second is an all around string that is solid in both power and comfort, and the third is softer, for the players who are worried about tennis elbow and other arm issues. The three strings are, Genesis Black Magic, Signum Pro Poly Plasma, and Pro Supex Blue Gear.

Black Magic is the string I find myself giving most to high performance players, both junior and adult. Black Magic is the string that I steer players towards who are looking for that professional feel. And the string I use myself.

The positives:

  • Plays great
  • Holds tension well
  • Great power
  • Manageable cost

The negatives:

  • Starts a little stiff
  • Not as high spin potential

Black magic is a string that holds tension very well and will continue to play like the quality string it is long after other polys have been cutout and re-strung. My only caution is that I recommend hitting with it before taking it into a match, as I feel it needs a  35 minutes break in period. 

The second string is a solid all around string that has something for everyone. 

Signum Pro Poly Plasma is another of my favorites for the player that may not be ready for the full power of the top poly and wants that extra comfort.

The Positives:

  • Holds tension
  • Good power and feel
  • Easier on the arm

The Negatives:

  • Lower durability
  • Less spin potential
  • Some issues with shearing (strings breaking prematurely)

Poly Plasma is a great string for players who have never used poly before and are interested in trying out the product. It gives you good power and spin without worrying about shoulder or elbow problems.

The last string is Pro Supex Blue Gear, a hexagonal polyester string for added grip of the ball.

Blue Gear is a string that has the properties of a polyester string coupling with the softer feel of a high end multi-filament string.

The Positives:

  • Soft on the arm
  • Great spin potential
  • Plays similar to a multi-filament

The Negatives:

  • Quick tension loss
  • Lower power
  • Costs more than some similar strings

Blue Gear is the string I give people when they are very concerned with arm problems but still want that added power and durability of polyester strings. I personally don’t use it due to tension loss but for that person that needs the added comfort it is a great string.

Pro Supex Big Ace Micro- 2008 Newcomer of The Year

March 27, 2009

Strings Depot Plus is proud to announce that Big Ace Micro received the prestigious award, 2008 Newcomer of The Year award conducted by www.stringforum.net. Our Pro Supex Big Ace Micro beat strings from brands like Babolat, Wilson, Prince , Head, and more!  Big Ace Micro provides excellent access to spin offering increased power and exceptional control. This is one of the most playable polyester strings that is currently available on the market today. Coming in an ultra thin 1.15mm gauge, Big Ace Micro is becoming a hit across the country among recreational and competitive players. For more info, click here.

Free String!!!

July 27, 2008

In an effort to expand our business, we will be offerring free strings all summer long! Now you are thinking that there is a catch!? Actually there is no catch. You will receive free string when ordering certain items through our online store. A special program was created where you can also recevie $50 store credit! Sounds good? We sure think so. For more information, visit our website or click here.