Archive for the ‘Pro Supex’ Category

Best Valued Multifilament Tennis String

June 17, 2014

Multifilament strings are great for the players that are seeking a great combination of feel, comfort, power and playability. The biggest advantage of them is higher elasticity and superior playability in comparison to polyester strings which are very popular amongst players today. The disadvantage is string durability as they tend to break quicker. This article is not designed to dive into what multifilament strings are or how they are constructed but instead what are the best-valued multilament stirngs on the market today. We here at The Tennis Depot pride ourselves in offering the highest quality products in the marketplace that comes with the best value and bang for the buck to the consumer.

The ultimate #1 valued multifiament string is the Pro Supex Maxim Touch which many players compare to Wilson Sensation, Wilson NXT, Tecnifibre NRG, Babolat Xcel Premium among many others. We have even gotten some that compared it to the Babolat VS Natural Gut or Pacific and Klip natural gut strings.

Pro Supex Maxim Touch has a multifilament core and is reinforced by outside wrapped fibres. It has a polyurethane coating and increases your sweetspot by 30%. This string is arm friendly and can decrease tennis-elbow problems. Maxim Touch works great as a hybrid as well as a full job. We recommend the 16 gauge if you are seeking durability and playability at the same time. When taking price into equation, Pro Supex Maxim Touch is hands down the absolute best multi string on the market today for its price.

Two other multi’s that offer incredible value are both the Genesis Thunder Blast and Genesis XplosionGenesis Thunder Blast offers amazing repulsion power and controlled spin. Players who come in to the net a lot will appreciate the soft capabilities of this string with its impeccable touch and comfort. Thunder Blast has also some of the best tension retention from any multifilament string thanks to a very unique construction process. The center core utilizes a very elastic monofilament compressed and heated to stretch easily. The outer core is twisted by soft elastic multifilaments. A coating resembling a rough surface is added for increased spin.

Genesis Xplosion is a multifilament string compromised of over 2000 filaments that are bonded and twisted together. Genesis Xplosion offers gut like performance without the premium price of most natural gut strings. Xplosion provides superior resiliency and maximum power. Utilizing special heating and cooling treatments, Genesis has achieved a very arm friendly string that offers great feel and touch. A polyurethane elastometer resin coating provides easier stringing and increased durability.

These 3 strings are without a doubt the best bang for the buck amongst multifilament strings out on the market. Be sure to check them out and let us know your feedback once tested!

 

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Keeping String Tension in Mind

May 11, 2010



This week, the topic up for discussion is string tension.  String tension is something that, despite being extremely important, most people don’t understand.  So here’s to making this a little more… lucid.

To me, string tension is every bit as important, if not MORE important, than any other part of your equipment (excluding the user, that is). String tension is also something that is extremely subjective, and depends on a variety of factors. What works for me may not work for you. What works for me on December 10th may completely fail me on July 10th.

First of all, what does string tension do? String tension influences how comfortable your string bed is. The higher the tension, the harsher the string bed, and the more damage your arm is liable to incur. For example, Kirschbaum Competition at 70 pounds will be harsher on your arm than will the same string at 50 pounds. If you’re having arm problems, consider dropping the tension on your string by 5 pounds and see how that works out for you. Also, string tension influences power. The higher the tension, the lower the power and the lower the tension, the higher the power (or rather, the ball will travel a longer distance with the same swing). If your shots are consistently shooting out by a couple of inches, consider upping the tension by 2-3 pounds.

Now, you might be wondering… why did Dan say that “What works for me on December 10th may completely fail me on July 10th ?” Well, strings tend to perform differently under different conditions (aka weather). The warmer the day, the “looser” the strings will feel, and shots will be a little deeper. As such, if you normally string Pro Supex Big Ace at 55 pounds in the winter, then you should consider upping the tension by 2 pounds in the warmer months to get a similar result. Also, humidity plays a factor on certain strings. Gut (such as newly available Pacific Tough Gut– try that out!) especially is particularly susceptible to humidity. If you’ve strung up with gut, either full or in a hybrid, then you probably shouldn’t use that particular racket in humid conditions. The reason is that humidity ruins gut: the strings will absorb the moisture in the air, and prolonged exposure to excessively humid conditions will make the gut strings virtually unplayable (they’ll lose tension, become a lot softer, and become “floppy”). That’s not to say that gut is the only string that humidity effects though. The more moisture there is in the air, the softer your string bed will feel. However, most strings will not be greatly effected by humidity.

A final point to keep in mind: string tension is EXTREMELY subjective.  What feels great to me might feel absolutely terrible to you.  Some people string their rackets in the teens, others, in the 70’s.  Find what works for YOU, not what works for person XXX.

The next time you’re getting your racket restrung, consider playing around a little with string tension. Up it a bit for more control, lower it a bit more for more power… who knows, maybe you’ll finally find your perfect setup?!

Hybrids

April 6, 2010

In the past few years, hybrids have become increasingly popular. More often than not, we see people with two different strings in their rackets. Many of pros have also gravitated towards hybrids: Federer with Alu and VS gut, Roddick with Hurricane and VS gut, etc. So, the questions that should come to mind are: what are the advantages of hybrids, and should I hybrid? I’ll try to answer both of those questions for you.

As a baseline, the hybrids that are generally used are gut mains with poly crosses, poly mains with gut crosses, gut mains with synthetic gut/multi crosses, and kevlar mains with synthetic gut crosses. There are several advantages to these various hybrids. First, hybrids combine the characteristics of two strings, and depending on how you string, can create some very nice combinations. The main strings are mainly responsible for the power (and with that, control) of the string bed, and also mainly for how the string bed feels. Thus, if you want your hybrid to feel mostly like polyester, then put your polyester string in the mains. If you want ultimate comfort, then put your gut in the mains. Crosses on the other hand add a bit of comfort and influence how stiff the string bed is. They will also influence power/control, but this influence is relatively small when compared to the influence of the mains. Thus, you can add a gut or a multi in the crosses to a polyester main to add some comfort and decrease the battering that your elbow gets. Or, you can add a polyester cross to a natural gut main to add a bit of control to the setup and increase stiffness. The second advantage of hybrids is cost. Let’s face it: strings can get pretty darn expensive. A full set of VS gut will set you back $42, a full set of Alu Rough will set you back around $16, and a full bed of Pro Line II will set you back around $12. I don’t know about you, but my wallet doesn’t appreciate being emptied every week. Thus, hybrids are nice. A hybrid of my favorite natural gut or polyester with a synthetic gut cross will cut my cost per string bed by around half, and give me something very close to that original feeling. Third, hybrids are generally easier to string that the full bed of string (despite giving a feel very close to a full bed). A bed of natural gut and synthetic is a lot easier to string than a full bed of natural gut. To go along with this, if your stringer is charging you extra for labor when he strings a hybrid, somebody’s trying to rip you off.

So to answer whether or not you should use a hybrid, you generally should if you fall into one of these categories: you want something that feels close to what you use now, but want something cheaper; you want something that’s a little more comfortable than the full bed of polyester you’re using now; you want to add a bit more control to what you’re using now (although this can be also done by adding a pound or two of tension to what you use now); or if you’re a stringer and want to have an easier time with stringing.

Hopefully, this will clear up any questions or confusion that you might have had about hybrids. If you’re still doubtful, take one for a try. I recommend taking whatever you use right now and using that for your mains and for your crosses, I’d recommend starting with a synthetic gut (favorites of mine include Forten Sweet and Pro Supex Syn Gut Spiral Flex). This should give you something close to what you normally use.

PS (if such a thing exists in a blog?) There are such things as prepackaged hybrids.  Take for example the Pro Supex Matrix Hybrid.  Such hybrids are nothing special- they’re just 2 half sets of strings that the manufacturer believes play well together.  You can get the exact same hybrid by purchasing one set each of Big Ace and Maxim Touch, cutting them in half and combining them.  Viola!  You’ve just created your very own “Pro Supex Matrix Hybrid.”

Black Magic or Spin X?

March 12, 2010

A few days… weeks… alright, months ago, an unknown string company entered the tennis string market. It was a small company that decided to introduce just two strings for its debut into the highly competitive tennis string market. Now, most companies like a nice balance of synthetic guts, multis and polyesters. Not this company. Judging from its first offerings, Genesis seems to be choosing the all-one-type-of-string route. They introduced two polyesters. EXCELLENT polyesters.

You’ve probably realized by now that I’m talking about Genesis. In the 9 months or so since Genesis strings hit the market, many players have fallen deeply in love. These polyesters bite hard, maintain their tension extraordinarily well, and are extremely comfortable. For most of us mere mortals, this is EXACTLY what we’re looking for in a third generation polyester.

But the problem is… which one? Do I choose Black Magic or Spin X? These strings fall right into the ever-growing category of sub-$100 reel polyesters, making them both very wallet friendly as well. Deciding on these strings based on price… well, it’s hard.

Let’s start with the Spin X. Spin X is textured. What that means is that Genesis manufactured these strings with a non-round shape, causing the string to BITE into the ball and created increased spin. As with all polyesters, Spin X generates an amazing amount of spin. It differs from most other textured polys (specifically MSV Hex, Blue Gear, among others) in that it maintains an excellent feel and allows you to feel connected to the ball. There’s a noticeable ball pocketing effect that just gives you this added smidge of confidence. There are two colors of this string, and it’s been reported that there’s a bit of difference. The pink/red string is slightly softer than its silver-colored brother. Both maintain tension well, and both have a nice feel, but the silver is for those looking to more closely replicate the feel of Luxilon Alu Rough (albeit it lacks the price tag and the pesky couple-of-hours-before-it-dies factor). It should be noted that with Spin X, there is a relatively steep tension drop in the first 24 hours after stringing, but then settles in and maintains that post-drop tension practically until it breaks.

Black Magic, on the other hand, is a smooth poly. It’s similar to Spin X, but it doesn’t give quite as much spin. I suppose you could say that Black Magic is similar to Big Ace, albeit stiffer and has less of a plasticky feel. Compared to Spin X, Black Magic has better feel. It’s a little more full-bodied, and is really quite enjoyable. Can you say that Black Magic is a better string? That would be pretty hard. They’re both excellent strings, and it would really be difficult to say which one is better.

Now, I’m not too sure whether or not I actually shifted your opinion one way or another. At the end of the day, they’re both excellent strings that come under $6 a set in reel form. Compare that to higher priced polys that come in at $15, $20 a set, and I’m left wondering how long Genesis is going to keep their prices this low. These are really excellent polyesters that can hang with the “Big Boys”. I recommend you hope on over to The Tennis Depot to try out a set of each and see which one YOU prefer.

To String or Not to String Part 3: Starting the Business

February 22, 2010

You have bought your new stringing machine, got your tools, learned how to string….now what? Once you get comfortable around your machine it is time to expand your client list and start making the money back you paid for the new equipment.

There are a couple things to know before you start. Who to target as potential customers, what additional strings should you purchase, and how much to charge other people.

Getting Customers:

Potential customers can come from a few different avenues, players you hit with on a regular basis, students you coach, if you coach, craigslist or a classified ad, and contacting clubs, high schools, and colleges in your area.

The easiest way initially to build your client base is talk your friends into stringing their racquets, you may give them a price break to demonstrate your ability and get them as repeat customers. Secondly, by talking to high school or college coaches you can negotiate a contract with them to handle all of their needs for either a lump­-sum payment or set a per racquet price, again at a small discount to enhance their interest in your services.

Purchasing new strings:

With the increase of customers you will need to stock some basic strings to allow for quick turnover when you receive racquets. The three main categories are value, comfort, and power.

A couple packs of each string will give you an initial inventory that can provide some options to potential customers without a long waiting period for ordering strings on a need basis. As you gain more business and string more racquets you will find which strings you need to keep in stock and find new strings that players like.

Price:

The final thing to figure out is how much to charge? The best way to figure this out is to go to the local pro shops and talk to other local stringers and find out their price scale.

The things you need to take into account are your cost of strings + shipping and tax and cost of labor. I start at $15 per racquet labor and add $2 to the actual cost of the string to cover shipping expenses. Many times Pro shops will add a premium to the cost of the string to increase their profits. As a small scale personal stringer you should be able to keep your costs low and swing that to lower prices for your customers.

The most important thing when growing your business is to provide quality service in a timely manner with great customer services. Go that extra mile, install an over grip, or add head guard tape free with restringing, whatever you can do to distinguish yourself from the other options.

Poly or not! with all the choices how to choose?

November 17, 2009

Cyberflash!, Tornado!,  Big Ace!, Black Magic!

Signum Pro Poly Plasma 16 (1.28)

These are just a few of the many high end polyester strings players have to choose from when they decide to step their string up to the next level.

In the past few years, and the emergence of polyester strings, the choices of what to put in your racquet have moved past nylon, synthetic, or natural gut. With a majority of professional players using some combination of co-polyesters and natural or synthetic guts juniors and club players want to use the same strings as the players they look up to.

The first thing to look at is why use polyester strings? Power, durability, increased control? The second area to look at, and is a concern when testing polyester strings, is elbow and shoulder issues. Polyester strings tend to be stiffer and harsher on the elbow and shoulder. However, there are many companies that have great options for the player that wants the feel of poly without the elbow issues.    

There are three strings I want to recommend. The first is a power string, for the high performance players, the second is an all around string that is solid in both power and comfort, and the third is softer, for the players who are worried about tennis elbow and other arm issues. The three strings are, Genesis Black Magic, Signum Pro Poly Plasma, and Pro Supex Blue Gear.

Black Magic is the string I find myself giving most to high performance players, both junior and adult. Black Magic is the string that I steer players towards who are looking for that professional feel. And the string I use myself.

The positives:

  • Plays great
  • Holds tension well
  • Great power
  • Manageable cost

The negatives:

  • Starts a little stiff
  • Not as high spin potential

Black magic is a string that holds tension very well and will continue to play like the quality string it is long after other polys have been cutout and re-strung. My only caution is that I recommend hitting with it before taking it into a match, as I feel it needs a  35 minutes break in period. 

The second string is a solid all around string that has something for everyone. 

Signum Pro Poly Plasma is another of my favorites for the player that may not be ready for the full power of the top poly and wants that extra comfort.

The Positives:

  • Holds tension
  • Good power and feel
  • Easier on the arm

The Negatives:

  • Lower durability
  • Less spin potential
  • Some issues with shearing (strings breaking prematurely)

Poly Plasma is a great string for players who have never used poly before and are interested in trying out the product. It gives you good power and spin without worrying about shoulder or elbow problems.

The last string is Pro Supex Blue Gear, a hexagonal polyester string for added grip of the ball.

Blue Gear is a string that has the properties of a polyester string coupling with the softer feel of a high end multi-filament string.

The Positives:

  • Soft on the arm
  • Great spin potential
  • Plays similar to a multi-filament

The Negatives:

  • Quick tension loss
  • Lower power
  • Costs more than some similar strings

Blue Gear is the string I give people when they are very concerned with arm problems but still want that added power and durability of polyester strings. I personally don’t use it due to tension loss but for that person that needs the added comfort it is a great string.

Textured Polyester String Breakdown

October 26, 2009

In the last 10 years the game of tennis has seem some serious changes; players are hitting the ball harder, deeper and heavier (a combination of power, depth and spin) than ever before.  Players are forced to be in amazing physical shape and an emphasis on conditioning that didn’t used to be so prominent has emerged.  Some analysts attribute the raised level of play to the newest advancement in tennis string technology: polyester strings.

Polyester strings are currently the hottest thing in the tennis market.  Because these strings offer a stiffer string bed, the player has greater control of the ball coming off the strings, even at very high swing speeds.  The stiffer strings also cut into the ball better than synthetic’s offering up more ball bite, which translate into spin.  Polyester was first introduced as an alternative to kevlar for those who broke synthetic strings too quickly and wanted a durable alternative.  Although they provided a long string life, they had poor tension maintenance and were also very stiff and often harsh on the elbow/arm, making them less than ideal for the average tennis player.  Since their initial introduction, manufacturing and string technology has allowed companies to produce polyester strings that maintain the benefits of durability while lowering the stiffness level, thus making them better suited to the majority of the tennis playing community.  Strings like Pro Supex Big Ace, Signum Pro Poly Plasma, Genesis Black Magic and Topspin Cyberflash exemplify this group.  They allow the user all the benefits (control, spin, durability) without the painfully stiff feel of the original first generation polyesters.

Most recently the string market has brought us a newer version of these polyester strings.  Polyester strings already have great ball bite and spin, but manufacturing the strings with texture provides even greater access to extreme amounts of spin on the ball at any speed.  This has created a new group of strings: textured polyesters.

One method of creating a textured polyester is to manufacture the string in a way to create a hexagonal shape as the string’s cross section.  Signum Pro Poly HEXtreme is one of the premier strings in this group.  The hex-shape provides great ball bite, but compared to the other texturing methods tends to be a little bit stiffer.  Like other strings in the Signum Pro Line, Pro Poly HEXtreme provides great tension maintenance and supreme playability right off the stringing machine.

When Pro Supex came onto the market a few years ago, their textured polyester offering created a ton of buzz in the tennis string market.  Pro Supex’s Blue Gear has a gear-shaped cross section as the name implies.  This gear shape gives the user even greater access to spin than previous hex-shaped polyesters, even in thicker diameters.  This string is also less susceptible  to notching with its unique design.  The only drawback I have encountered is that after some time the gear shape on the string can wear down with play, but this is only in extreme cases.

Genesis' Spin-X

Genesis' Spin-X

The final and most recent method of manufacturing spin-producing textured polyesters involves coaxially twisting the string about itself creating a “twisted” cross section.  Both Genesis’ Spin-X and Signum Pro’s Blackline Tornado are great examples of this new method of manufacturing.  These two offerings provide the best ball bite and spin access of the bunch with little feeling in the arm.  They provide the ultimate blend of control, spin and durability.

All of these strings can benefit most tennis players, whether through a full string bed or a hybrid setup with a softer synthetic gut or multifiliment in the crosses.  I recommend checking them out if you haven’t yet; they could easily help raise your game to the next level!

2009 GSS Symposium Recap

October 13, 2009

The 2009 GSS Symposium has come to an end. First and foremost, we would like to applaud Tim Strawn for organizing such a wonderful event. The seminar leaders were all fantastic. Dave Bone, president of the USRSA was on site offering the insight scoop of all the latest information from his organization. We urge all stringers to make it a priority to attend this event next year. Not only do you meet fellow stringers from across the world, but the information received is so valuable that you are guaranteed to leave the symposium with a greater level of knowledge. From learning how to customize racquets to mastering customer service, the seminars are simply fantastic. Bob Patterson from Racquetmaxx was also one of the seminar leaders offering his knowledge to all attendants.

There was also a speed stringing contest. The winner was Vasiliy Guryonov. His best time came in the finals finishing in just 13 minutes, 57 seconds! All contestants were stringing on the Prince 6000. The racquet was the Prince EXO3 Rebel (18×20) using the poly Prince Twisted string. Considering the tight pattern and the string being used was a poly, Vasiliy managed to complete the racquet in just under 14 minutes. Born in Uzbekistan, Vasiliy is a 25 year old currently working in Midtown Athletic Club (Chicago). After meeting with him several times throughout the symposium, he has great ambitions and hopes to one day string on the pro tour. We think he has the potential.

In addition to all of the great seminars, the trade show was also a great success. The Tennis Depot was present representing Genesis, Pro Supex, and Topspin. What made us really happy is all the people who stopped by our booth looking at the products these brands offer and understanding that the quality and performance exceeds those of the major brands. From the Genesis side, we offered a preview of the new Genesis Spin X silver color. In addition, we offered white and silver stencil ink, perfect for all the black strings that are coming on to the market. While there were no new Pro Supex products, we did display the entire range of Pro Supex polys, synthetics, and accessories. The Pro Supex Leather Grips received lots of attention. After all the price/performance ratio is superior.

Without doubt the most exciting part of the trade show came from Topspin. The Tennis Depot together with Alpha Tennis previewed 3 new strings from the Topspin range! These new Topspin strings are: Cyber Twirl, Cyber  Whirl, and Cyber Black. The Cyber Twirl is a pentagonal shaped string that is twisted. It will be offered in both natural and black colors. Cyber Whirl is an octagonal shaped string that is available in orange color. Lastly, Cyber Black continues Topspin’s heritage of offering superior playing soft co-polys. Cyber Black is round shaped and as the name applies, it will come in a black color. All of these new strings will be available later this fall.

With all of this excitement, you are thinking can there possibly be anything else. Well yes there is! The Tennis Depot previewed the X series and Fusion series racquets. Soon enough, these racquets will be made widely available throughout the country. We also met with the owner and president of Topspin who came to Orlando for the symposium. There are many great plans for the future of Topspin Tennis in the USA. Besides bringing in new strings and the new racquets mentioned above, The Tennis Depot will soon be re-releasing the Pure series racquets to American consumers.

Last but certainly not least, Alpha will be launching a new electronic machine this November! The Alpha Odyssey, is a constant pull machine offering all the latest bells and whistles. Designed to compete directly with other electronic machines such as Prince 6000 and Babolat Star 5, the new Alpha Odyssey will be offered at a rock bottom price of just $2200. Certainly a great value, The Tennis Depot will be offering this wonderful machine very soon.

With all of this excitement stirring, we would like to thank all of our supporters. The Tennis Depot is looking at a great future and we will continue to introduce new products on a monthly basis.

Blog Post Position

October 6, 2009

We have received TONS of requests on the blog post position. We are thankful for so many supporters. Our customers are the reason why The Tennis Depot is the fastest growing online retailer. With one of the largest distribution networks in the world, The Tennis Depot is truly the premier online tennis destination.

All those who submitted applications for our new position; we would like to thank you for giving us the opportunity to select you. We are sorry to say that we are unable to select all applicants. As we have received over 30 applications, only a few will be selected. Regardless if you join our team or not, we do wish you the best of luck and hope to interact with you in the near future.

Don’t forget, the sympoisum we have all been waiting for is this upcoming weekend. The Tennis Depot will have staff members throughout the entire 4 day event. Additionally, we will have a booth during the trade show (Monday). We will be representing 3 brands we distribute; on the behalf of Genesis, Pro Supex, and Topspin.

For a quick preview, there will be some new products in the Genesis lineup. As for Topspin, we will be inviting all guests to take a look at the Topspin Xtreme Racquet series, offered exclusively through The Tennis Depot.

As always, if you ever have any questions, feel free to let us know.

Pro Supex Maxim Touch- Possibly the Best Kept Secret

June 9, 2009

Pro Supex Maxim Touch, a high-end premium multi which has received comparisons to strings priced nearly 2 or 3 times higher has a multifilament core and is reinforced by outside wrapped fibres. The polyurethane coating makes Maxim Touch a very arm-friendly string. While most of the attention goes to the wonderful polys Pro Supex makes, Maxim Touch has slowly been gaining ground. Many of our customers have cited it as the best valued multifilament string around! At approximately $5 a set (when buying a reel), Maxim Touch is a great performer for the money.

What really awes us is that people have said that Maxim Touch outperforms strings such as Wilson NXT and Tecnifibre NRG2! If you are looking for a high end multifilament string at a fraction of the cost then we encourage you to give Pro Supex Maxim Touch a try. Starting price is $7.95 a set and $89.95 a reel.